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‘68: HALLOWED GROUND Print on Sale in Memory of Josh Medors

‘68: HALLOWED GROUND Print on Sale in Memory of Josh Medors

Posted on October 18, 2013 by Jamie Parreno

Special edition print to benefit the family of Josh Medors

The creators of the Image Comics series ‘68 are proud to present a limited collector's edition print in memory of the late comics artist Josh Medors. A courageous survivor of a rare form of spinal cancer, Josh outlived his original prognosis by years before finally passing in 2012. The print is an 11"x17" double-sided glossy reproduction of the ‘68: HALLOWED GROUND one-shot cover image by Medors, with a matching back cover illustration by Nat Jones and Jay Fotos. Printed at full production size, this print is limited to only 100 copies, and comes hand-numbered and signed in pencil by ‘68 series founders Mark Kidwell, Nat Jones, and Jay Fotos. It ships in a protective rigid Mylar sleeve and will be available worldwide. To honor their friend and colleague, the ‘68 creators are donating all proceeds from the sale of the print to Medors' wife Charlotte and son Garth.

The ‘68: HALLOWED GROUND benefit print is available for purchase at http://68zombie.acmeprints.com/josh-medors-benefit-print/ and costs $40.00.

‘68: HALLOWED GROUND goes on-sale 11/6 , and features the story of two soldiers freshly back from Vietnam and forced into a showdown against hordes of zombies while holed up in a church. ‘68: HALLOWED GROUND was one of the last projects Medors worked on before passing away. He provided a cover, layouts, and thumbnails for the book, which were used to create the final one-shot. The issue ships with a cover by Medors (Diamond Code SEP130505) as well as a special cover by Bernie Wrightson (Diamond Code SEP130506).

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The common rail system prototype was developed in the late 1960s by Robert Huber of Switzerland and the technology further developed by Dr. Marco Ganser at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich, later of Ganser-Hydromag AG (est.1995) in Ober?geri.
The first successful usage in a production vehicle began in Japan by the mid-1990s. Dr. Shohei Itoh and Masahiko Miyaki of the Denso Corporation, a Japanese automotive parts manufacturer, developed the Common Rail fuel system for heavy duty vehicles and turned it into practical use on their ECD-U2 common-rail system mounted on the Hino Rising Ranger truck and sold for general use in 1995.[3] Denso claims the first commercial high pressure common rail system in 1995.[4]
Modern common rail systems, whilst working on the same principle sensor are governed by an engine control unit (ECU) which opens each injector electronically rather than mechanically. This was extensively prototyped in the 1990s with collaboration between Magneti Marelli,Centro Ricerche Fiat and Elasis. After research and development by the Fiat Group, the design was acquired by the German companyRobert Bosch GmbH for completion of development and refinement for mass-production Common Rail Nozzle . In hindsight, the sale appeared to be a tactical error for Fiat, as the new technology proved to be highly profitable. The Common Rail Injector Valve had little choice but to sell, however, as it was in a poor financial state at the time and lacked the resources to complete development on its own.[5] In 1997 they extended its use for passenger cars Common Rail Injector . The first passenger car that used the common rail system was the 1997 model Alfa Romeo 156 2.4 JTD,[6] and later on that same year Mercedes-Benz C 220 CDI.
Common Rail Shim & Gasket kit have been used in marine and locomotive applications for some time。 The Cooper-Bessemer GN-8 (circa 1942) is an example of a hydraulically operated common rail diesel engine, also known as a modified common rail.

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