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"I've never done horror yet, and I felt like that was something I was interested in. A lot of that comes from the decision to do a book with Andrea Sorrentino," Lemire says of his artist on Old Man Logan and Green Arrow. "The work that Andrea does and the things he likes to explore in his artwork—doing something that was a little darker, possibly a horror book or a psychological thriller—Gideon Falls just grew out of our conversations tailoring stuff to his wishlist." Horror’s a difficult genre to approach in comics. When it comes to horror in other media—namely film and television—an arsenal of proven tools exists to unsettle and startle audiences, manipulating primal feelings with music, editing, and the suspense of watching lives unfold in linear time. Comics don't have those tools, but they do have a few of their own. "What I'm trying to do in Gideon is just... a mood.

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"I've never done horror yet, and I felt like that was something I was interested in. A lot of that comes from the decision to do a book with Andrea Sorrentino," Lemire says of his artist on Old Man Logan and Green Arrow. "The work that Andrea does and the things he likes to explore in his artwork—doing something that was a little darker, possibly a horror book or a psychological thriller—Gideon Falls just grew out of our conversations tailoring stuff to his wishlist." Horror’s a difficult genre to approach in comics. When it comes to horror in other media—namely film and television—an arsenal of proven tools exists to unsettle and startle audiences, manipulating primal feelings with music, editing, and the suspense of watching lives unfold in linear time. Comics don't have those tools, but they do have a few of their own. "What I'm trying to do in Gideon is just... a mood.

Whatever comics you read when you were young," Lemire muses, "if they were mainstream superhero comics, they're full of this kind of cartoon action violence, and you're immersed in that. But that violence never really has consequences." Of course, Lemire concedes, comics would grow up to examine themselves and their violence, spending the '80s and beyond in deconstruction and parody and metafictional exegesis—but maybe they became too clever for their own good. Few creators in comics have been as fascinated with exploring violence in the stark, quiet, and devastating way Jeff Lemire has: violence both external and internal, subdued conflicts between, and within, people navigating loss, loneliness, mental illness, and faith. Lemire has done this in hundreds of stories in countless genres, but Gideon Falls, which debuted last week, has Lemire teaming up with frequent collaborator Andrea Sorrentino, colorist Dave Stewart, and letterer Steve Wands to try his hand at something new—horror.

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"I've never done horror yet, and I felt like that was something I was interested in. A lot of that comes from the decision to do a book with Andrea Sorrentino," Lemire says of his artist on Old Man Logan and Green Arrow. "The work that Andrea does and the things he likes to explore in his artwork—doing something that was a little darker, possibly a horror book or a psychological thriller—Gideon Falls just grew out of our conversations tailoring stuff to his wishlist." Horror’s a difficult genre to approach in comics. When it comes to horror in other media—namely film and television—an arsenal of proven tools exists to unsettle and startle audiences, manipulating primal feelings with music, editing, and the suspense of watching lives unfold in linear time. Comics don't have those tools, but they do have a few of their own. "What I'm trying to do in Gideon is just... a mood, a feeling of unease that is consistent, and having that be the drum under everything," Lemire says. And to do that, he wants to dig into his characters’ heads. And yours.

Whatever comics you read when you were young," Lemire muses, "if they were mainstream superhero comics, they're full of this kind of cartoon action violence, and you're immersed in that. But that violence never really has consequences." Of course, Lemire concedes, comics would grow up to examine themselves and their violence, spending the '80s and beyond in deconstruction and parody and metafictional exegesis—but maybe they became too clever for their own good. Few creators in comics have been as fascinated with exploring violence in the stark, quiet, and devastating way Jeff Lemire has: violence both external and internal, subdued conflicts between, and within, people navigating loss, loneliness, mental illness, and faith. Lemire has done this in hundreds of stories in countless genres, but Gideon Falls, which debuted last week, has Lemire teaming up with frequent collaborator Andrea Sorrentino, colorist Dave Stewart, and letterer Steve Wands to try his hand at something new—horror.

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Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud.

Whatever comics you read when you were young," Lemire muses, "if they were mainstream superhero comics, they're full of this kind of cartoon action violence, and you're immersed in that. But that violence never really has consequences." Of course, Lemire concedes, comics would grow up to examine themselves and their violence, spending the '80s and beyond in deconstruction and parody and metafictional exegesis—but maybe they became too clever for their own good. Few creators in comics have been as fascinated with exploring violence in the stark, quiet, and devastating way Jeff Lemire has: violence both external and internal, subdued conflicts between, and within, people navigating loss, loneliness, mental illness, and faith. Lemire has done this in hundreds of stories in countless genres, but Gideon Falls, which debuted last week, has Lemire teaming up with frequent collaborator Andrea Sorrentino, colorist Dave Stewart, and letterer Steve Wands to try his hand at something new—horror.

Gideon Falls, which debuted last week, has Lemire teaming up with frequent collaborator Andrea Sorrentino.

Whatever comics you read when you were young," Lemire muses, "if they were mainstream superhero comics, they're full of this kind of cartoon action violence, and you're immersed in that. But that violence never really has consequences." Of course, Lemire concedes, comics would grow up to examine themselves and their violence, spending the '80s and beyond in deconstruction and parody and metafictional exegesis—but maybe they became too clever for their own good. Few creators in comics have been as fascinated with exploring violence in the stark, quiet, and devastating way Jeff Lemire has: violence both external and internal, subdued conflicts between, and within, people navigating loss, loneliness, mental illness, and faith. Lemire has done this in hundreds of stories in countless genres, but Gideon Falls, which debuted last week, has Lemire teaming up with frequent collaborator Andrea Sorrentino, colorist Dave Stewart, and letterer Steve Wands to try his hand at something new—horror.

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Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud.

Whatever comics you read when you were young," Lemire muses, "if they were mainstream superhero comics, they're full of this kind of cartoon action violence, and you're immersed in that. But that violence never really has consequences." Of course, Lemire concedes, comics would grow up to examine themselves and their violence, spending the '80s and beyond in deconstruction and parody and metafictional exegesis—but maybe they became too clever for their own good. Few creators in comics have been as fascinated with exploring violence in the stark, quiet, and devastating way Jeff Lemire has: violence both external and internal, subdued conflicts between, and within, people navigating loss, loneliness, mental illness, and faith. Lemire has done this in hundreds of stories in countless genres, but Gideon Falls, which debuted last week, has Lemire teaming up with frequent collaborator Andrea Sorrentino, colorist Dave Stewart, and letterer Steve Wands to try his hand at something new—horror.