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The Next Generation of CYBERFORCE Remains Affordable

The Next Generation of CYBERFORCE Remains Affordable

Posted on August 20, 2013 by Jamie Parreno

Comics Legend Marc Silvestri Builds on Crowd-Funded Support of Fans

Cybernetic freedom fighters defend civilization from evil corporations and their takeover of the world in CYBERFORCE. Written and created by Marc Silvestri (THE DARKNESS, Uncanny X-Men), with art by Marco Turini, colors by Andy Troy (Astonishing X-Men), and finishes by digital wizard Stjepan Sejic (RAVINE, THE DARKNESS: THE DEATH OF JACKIE ESTACADO), CYBERFORCE #6 marks a landmark issue for the series and the beginning of a new story arc. CYBERFORCE launched with a record-setting promotion that gave readers the first five issues for free, making issue 6 the first issue in the series to cost anything, offered at the affordable price of $2.99.

Thanks to the crowdfunding site Kickstarter, TOP COW PRODUCTIONS, INC., and their loyal and amazing fans were able to raise enough money to resurrect the CYBERFORCE franchise. As a result, the first five issues of CYBERFORCE were sent to retailers all across the world to give away for free. Nothing like this had been done in comic book history, and as a result, fans have clamored for more. Issue 6, due in September, brings an end to the free promotion, but Silvestri trusts that the first five issues and the strength of this new story are enough incentive for readers to keep going.

In CYBERFORCE, corporations control everything, and a young woman named Velocity must escape her mother and sister’s grasp in order to search for a very important man named Stryker. With the big companies on top, normal people are forced to live in what’s left of the cities. These people are protected by CYBERFORCE, a group of former soldiers who have banded together to fight for the weak, hunted, and oppressed. After the conclusion of their first story arc, issue 6 introduces readers to a new purpose and mission for the CYBERFORCE crew. Revenge has been achieved, so survival is now top priority as a more dangerous and uncontrollable threat has been activated.

"The lines between good and evil, and fact and fiction continue to blur as CYBERFORCE falls farther down the technological rabbit hole,” Silvestri explains. “Artist Marco Turini brings our worst nightmares to life as we learn that Cyber Data may in fact be the least of our problems."

PRAISE FOR CYBERFORCE

"Marc Silvestri and Matt Hawkins have a built an interesting world here."
-IGN

"The writing and artwork are solid and the world presented promises intrigue as well as sweet robot/cyborg fights."
-Destroy The Cyborg

“Cyberforce is a series I normally wouldn’t have read, but found the writing to be excellent, gradually getting better with each issue. It’s now been added to my pull list.”
-Nerd Nation Radio

Comic Book Resources has given the series praise and recently posted the entire fifth issue of CYBERFORCE on their site for fans to enjoy.

CYBERFORCE issues 1-5 can be read at the Top Cow website, or picked up for free at any local comic shop.

CYBERFORCE #6 will be released in comic shops on September 18 (Diamond Code MAY130409) and will be available digitally on the Image Comics website as well as ComiXology.
 

Comments

keese88 — 3/8/17 @ 12:47am

The common rail system prototype was developed in the late 1960s by Robert Huber of Switzerland and the technology further developed by Dr. Marco Ganser at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich, later of Ganser-Hydromag AG (est.1995) in Ober?geri.
The first successful usage in a production vehicle began in Japan by the mid-1990s. Dr. Shohei Itoh and Masahiko Miyaki of the Denso Corporation, a Japanese automotive parts manufacturer, developed the Common Rail fuel system for heavy duty vehicles and turned it into practical use on their ECD-U2 common-rail system mounted on the Hino Rising Ranger truck and sold for general use in 1995.[3] Denso claims the first commercial high pressure common rail system in 1995.[4]
Modern common rail systems, whilst working on the same principle sensor are governed by an engine control unit (ECU) which opens each injector electronically rather than mechanically. This was extensively prototyped in the 1990s with collaboration between Magneti Marelli,Centro Ricerche Fiat and Elasis. After research and development by Fiat Group, the design was acquired by the German companyRobert Bosch GmbH for completion of development and refinement for mass-production Common Rail Nozzle . In hindsight, the sale appeared to be a tactical error for Fiat, as the new technology proved to be highly profitable. The Common Rail Injector Valve had little choice but to sell, however, as it was in a poor financial state at the time and lacked the resources to complete development on its own.[5] In 1997 they extended its use for passenger cars Common Rail Injector . The first passenger car that used the common rail system was the 1997 model Alfa Romeo 156 2.4 JTD,[6] and later on that same year Mercedes-Benz C 220 CDI.
Common Rail Shim & Gasket kit have been used in marine and locomotive applications for some time. The Cooper-Bessemer GN-8 (circa 1942) is an example of a hydraulically operated common rail diesel engine, also known as a modified common rail.

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