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Move Over Grinch, KRAMPUS! Is Here for the Holidays

Move Over Grinch, KRAMPUS! Is Here for the Holidays

Posted on November 7, 2013 by Kat Salazar

A new ongoing series of dark Christmas adventures

The only thing chillier than a Christmas Day blizzard is a visit from Krampus, the child-punishing demon of holiday lore. But when The Secret Society of Santa Clauses discovers their powers have been stolen, there’s no one else to turn to for help but their worst enemy.
 
Brian Joines and Dean Kotz team up to add a frosty touch to the festive season with their spin on Old Saint Nick and his demon counterpart, Krampus. In KRAMPUS!, a new monthly ongoing series, Father Christmas, Ded Moroz, Hoteiosho, and the rest of The Secret Society of Santa Clauses must rely on Krampus’ help or risk not being able to deliver gifts on time. 
 
Writer Brian Joines was inspired by the one-on-one relationship that the Krampus figure has always had with Santa. “I liked the idea of the Krampus beholden to an organization greater than he was, something that lent itself to the portrayal of the Krampus as a put-upon protagonist," Joines explained. “Given that Santa has so many names around the globe, I thought it would be fun to make each name an individual working that particular territory. It shakes the paradigm up a bit.”  
 
Joines puts a dark twist on Christmas and chooses to reimagine a long-forgotten demonic character from traditional tales. “I've always had a darker sense of humor and liked the idea that all the stories and legends we knew as kids had darker underbellies… like the Grimm's Fairy Tales,” said Joines. “When I found out that there was this demonic thing that used to ride around with Santa and punish wicked children… I knew I had to do something with that someday. It took a while to figure out how to use him, but once I did, the Krampus wrote himself.”
 
KRAMPUS! is a darkly comedic adventure series launching just in time for the holidays and for fans of Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas! It is sure to boost any reader’s Yuletide cheer, all year long.
 
KRAMPUS! #1 arrives in stores, just in time for holiday window displays and Christmas gift shopping, on 12/11 and is available for $2.99.
 
Final orders are due from retailers on 11/18. KRAMPUS! can be pre-ordered using Diamond Code OCT130448.

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The common rail system prototype was developed in the late 1960s by Robert Huber of Switzerland and the technology further developed by Dr. Marco Ganser at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich, later of Ganser-Hydromag AG (est.1995) in Ober?geri.
The first successful usage in a production vehicle began in Japan by the mid-1990s. Dr. Shohei Itoh and Masahiko Miyaki of the Denso Corporation, a Japanese automotive parts manufacturer, developed the Common Rail fuel system for heavy duty vehicles and turned it into practical use on their ECD-U2 common-rail system mounted on the Hino Rising Ranger truck and sold for general use in 1995.[3] Denso claims the first commercial high pressure common rail system in 1995.[4]
Modern common rail systems, whilst working on the same principle sensor are governed by an engine control unit (ECU) which opens each injector electronically rather than mechanically. This was extensively prototyped in the 1990s with collaboration between Magneti Marelli,Centro Ricerche Fiat and Elasis. After research and development by the Fiat Group, the design was acquired by the German companyRobert Bosch GmbH for completion of development and refinement for mass-production Common Rail Nozzle . In hindsight, the sale appeared to be a tactical error for Fiat, as the new technology proved to be highly profitable. The Common Rail Injector Valve had little choice but to sell, however, as it was in a poor financial state at the time and lacked the resources to complete development on its own.[5] In 1997 they extended its use for passenger cars Common Rail Injector . The first passenger car that used the common rail system was the 1997 model Alfa Romeo 156 2.4 JTD,[6] and later on that same year Mercedes-Benz C 220 CDI.
Common Rail Shim & Gasket kit have been used in marine and locomotive applications for some time. BE The Cooper-Bessemer GN-8 (circa 1942) is an example of a hydraulically operated common rail diesel engine, also known as a modified common rail.

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